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  1. Public health research and practice is faced with three problems: 1) a focus on disease instead of health, 2) consideration of risk factor/disease relationships one at a time, and 3) attention to individuals w...

    Authors: Nancy L Fleischer, Ann M Weber, Susan Gruber, Karina Z Arambula, Maya Mascarenhas, Jessica A Frasure, Constance Wang and S Leonard Syme
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2006 3:18
  2. There are several reasons that someone might be diagnosed with more than one primary cancer. The aim of this analysis was to determine combinations of cancer types that occur more often than expected. The expe...

    Authors: Chris D Bajdik, Zenaida U Abanto, John J Spinelli, Angela Brooks-Wilson and Richard P Gallagher
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2006 3:17
  3. The recent Immigration Bill debate in the United States Congress has again re-ignited the polemic regarding immigration policy. In this essay, I argue that disputes surrounding the legality of migrant workers ...

    Authors: Clarence C Tam
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2006 3:15
  4. Modern public health strives for maximizing benefits for the highest number of people while protecting individual rights. Restrictions on individual rights are justified for two reasons-for the benefit of the ...

    Authors: Daniel A Salmon and Saad B Omer
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2006 3:13
  5. Surprisingly little is known regarding the human mixing patterns relevant to the spread of close-contact infections, such as measles, influenza and meningococcal disease. This study aims to estimate the number...

    Authors: WJ Edmunds, G Kafatos, J Wallinga and JR Mossong
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2006 3:10
  6. The goal of this paper is to analyze the stochastic dynamics of childhood infectious disease time series. We present an univariate time series analysis of pertussis, mumps, measles and rubella based on Box-Jen...

    Authors: Helen Trottier, Pierre Philippe and Roch Roy
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2006 3:9
  7. In their commentary on my paper Phillips and Goodman suggested that counterfactual causality and considerations on causality like those by Bradford Hill are only "guideposts on the road to common sense". I arg...

    Authors: Michael Höfler
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2006 3:8
  8. Regression calibration as a method for handling measurement error is becoming increasingly well-known and used in epidemiologic research. However, the standard version of the method is not appropriate for expo...

    Authors: Ingvild Dalen, John P Buonaccorsi, Petter Laake, Anette Hjartåker and Magne Thoresen
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2006 3:6
  9. Immigration is increasing in Italy. In 2003, 2.6 million foreign citizens lived in the country; 52% were men and the majority were young adults who migrated for work. The purpose of this study was to investiga...

    Authors: Laura Cacciani, Giovanni Baglio, Lorenza Rossi, Enrico Materia, Maurizio Marceca, Salvatore Geraci, Angela Spinelli, John Osborn and Gabriella Guasticchi
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2006 3:4
  10. Urban-rural comparisons are of limited relevance in examining the effects of urban migration in developing countries where urbanisation is due to growth of existing urban populations, expansion of urban bounda...

    Authors: Tanica Lyngdoh, Sanjay Kinra, Yoav Ben Shlomo, Srinath Reddy, Dorairaj Prabhakaran, George Davey Smith and Shah Ebrahim
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2006 3:2
  11. The epidemiologic literature is replete with conceptual discussions about causal inference, but little is known about how the causal criteria are applied in public health practice. The criteria for causal infe...

    Authors: Mark Parascandola, Douglas L Weed and Abhijit Dasgupta
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2006 3:1
  12. A new scientific discipline arose in the late 20th century known as biodemography. When applied to aging, biodemography is the scientific study of common age patterns and causes of death observed among humans and...

    Authors: S Jay Olshansky, Mark Grant, Jacob Brody and Bruce A Carnes
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2005 2:10
  13. This review summarises theoretical studies attempting to assess the population impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) use on mortality and HIV incidence. We describe the key parameters that determine the impac...

    Authors: Rebecca F Baggaley, Neil M Ferguson and Geoff P Garnett
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2005 2:9
  14. Previous studies have assessed the validity of the observational study design by comparing results of studies using this design to results from randomized controlled trials. The present study examined design f...

    Authors: Arthur Hartz, Suzanne Bentler, Mary Charlton, Douglas Lanska, Yogita Butani, G Mustafa Soomro and Kjell Benson
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2005 2:8
  15. Influenza-associated excess mortality is widely used to assess the severity of influenza epidemics. In Germany, however, it is not yet established as a routine component of influenza surveillance. We therefore...

    Authors: Phillip Zucs, Udo Buchholz, Walter Haas and Helmut Uphoff
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2005 2:6
  16. Dengue is the most important arthropod-borne viral disease of public health significance. Compared with nine reporting countries in the 1950s, today the geographic distribution includes more than 100 countries...

    Authors: Debarati Guha-Sapir and Barbara Schimmer
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2005 2:1
  17. In sub-Saharan Africa, HIV/AIDS and violent conflict interact to shape population health and development in dramatic ways. HIV/AIDS can create conditions conducive to conflict. Conflict can affect the epidemio...

    Authors: Nancy B Mock, Sambe Duale, Lisanne F Brown, Ellen Mathys, Heather C O'Maonaigh, Nina KL Abul-Husn and Sterling Elliott
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2004 1:6
  18. In this first special theme issue, Emerging Themes in Epidemiology publishes a collection of articles on the theme of Epidemiology in conflict. Violent conflict is an issue of great sensitivity within public heal...

    Authors: Clarence C Tam, Ben A Lopman, Olga Bornemisza and Egbert Sondorp
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2004 1:5
  19. Applied epidemiologists are increasingly working in areas of insecurity and active conflict to define the health risks, suggest feasible means to reduce these risks and, monitor the capacity and reconstruction...

    Authors: Sharon M McDonnell, Paul Bolton, Nadine Sunderland, Ben Bellows, Mark White and Eric Noji
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2004 1:4
  20. There have been significant improvements in the design and management of humanitarian aid responses in the last decade. In particular, a significant body of knowledge has been accumulated about public health i...

    Authors: Les Roberts and Charles-Antoine Hofmann
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2004 1:3
  21. Emerging Themes in Epidemiology is a new, online Open Access journal. This editorial – which coincides with the Journal's launch – describes its unique review and publication model. The editorial board and review...

    Authors: Ben A Lopman
    Citation: Emerging Themes in Epidemiology 2004 1:2